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Author Topic: October 07 Healthletter- How are your kids bodies going to hold up?  (Read 14283 times)

Steve Lockhart

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In this months healthletter I would like to take the focus away from the adults for a moment and look at your children. The reason is because children’s body’s are often neglected under the assumption that if they don’t complain of pain there is nothing wrong, but in fact this is often not the case.

Over the years I have treated dozens of children who had either not complained at all or had just complained of a stiff back yet when I got them on the table I discovered a very twisted body that if on an adult would be enough to generate significant pain.

The reason why children don’t seem to feel much pain could be put down to their body being very supple and elastic that will bend and flex to accommodate the twisting but the reality is they are setting themselves up for a very painful and possibly miserable adulthood if nothing is done about it.

The symptoms children do feel from a body that is out of balance is low energy, stomach upset or pain, loss of appetite, headaches, irritability or perhaps unsteadiness on their feet.

Did I just describe your kids? Well if so it may have been from the diet they are eating but it may also have been from having a body that is out of balance.

Let me give you a few examples of patients I have seen over the years that come to mind.

A 3 year old girl who complained of bad pain in her stomach intermittently that would come for 20 or 30 seconds then go and may happen 3 or 5 times a day or a couple of times a week. Her mother had also noticed the child had started sleeping for an extra hour a day for no reason. She took her to the doctor who thought it was a urinary tract infection but that proved negative and then she was stumped. She brought her to me and I found she had a short right leg and locked up erectors. (yes even at just 3 years old) I loosened her up and she never had the stomach problem again and her sleep patterns returned to normal.

Another patient was telling me about her 18 month old daughter who had fallen off the bed onto the timber floor and knocked herself out. The lady said since then she noticed the daughter fell over a lot. I suggested she should bring her in for a check up and in doing so found her body was quite out of balance. I straightened her up and she was much steadier on her feet from then on.

A 14 year old girl had fallen down some stairs some 6 years earlier and after having her X Rayed by the doctor and found to have nothing broken the parents were told she was fine. At 14 she complained of a stiff back. When I examined her I found she had a right leg that was one whole inch shorter than her left and a bad scoliosis of her spine and never knew about it. It took about 12 months of monthly treatment to get her body straight again but that definitely saved her from some terrible symptoms that would have struck her in her adult years.

Has your child had any bad falls or accidents that they shook off after a short time and nothing further was done about it? Because if they have the chances are they are still carrying around the muscle trauma from it and will be until their body is treated correctly.

Because children don’t notice their problems and they are rarely picked up by a doctor or parent. It is common for them to develop in their body for 10 or 20 years before they cause a real problem. In fact I have found that many adults I treat have symptoms that come from muscle imbalances that can be traced back to their childhood. They are often very frustrated and disappointed that they weren’t picked up at the time.

It is the first 20 years where people are generally most active, and reckless, and so this is the time they are most likely to pick up the start of problems. It is also the time those problems are easiest to get rid of, before they amount to anything.

I suggest that if you are reading this and have children, stand them aside and do a quick check on their body to see how things look.

Here is what you do,

Get them to strip down to their underwear and stand 3 metres or 10 foot away from you so you are looking at them from the back. Have them stand so that their weight is evenly balanced on both legs.

Look at the spine, does it look straight?

Do the erector spinae muscles either side of their spine look even?

Does their pelvis look level?

Are their shoulders at the same height?

Do the muscles at the back of their shoulders look even?

When they are standing there relaxed does their head point straight ahead or is it turned to one side slightly?

Does the space on either side of their spine at the neck look even?

Get them to reach straight up high in the air with both arms, Do their fingertips on each hand reach the same height?

Do the shoulder heights still look even?

Do the muscles at the back of their shoulders look even?


Most of the obvious imbalances can be seen in the back by checking these things so if everything look pretty balanced it is a fairly good indication all is well.

On the other hand if things look unbalanced you are probably wondering what you can do about it and that is a good question. If there is an SLM therapist in your area then the best things would be to book them in and have the imbalances taken away, but if there isn’t anyone you have a more difficult problem.

I could suggest the self treatment program but I know the reality of getting most children to commit to doing that when they don’t feel any real symptoms would be very difficult. I wouldn’t have the confidence that a physiotherapist would deal with it correctly because they don’t do the full body treatments which is what these sorts of problems need. I would have the same reservations about them seeing a chiropractor to have it fixed because they would only be adjusting the bones and the lack of muscle work would mean the results would be unlikely to last very long. Plus as per the information in the Bad Back Book, their may be other issues needing attention such as the way they sleep, their posture, their diet etc.


Just as the self treatment program is a great solution for adults with these sorts of problems I am working on a solution for children and hopefully will have something for you in the not too distant future.


In the meantime good health.

 


« Last Edit: December 27, 2007, 03:21:33 AM by Steve Lockhart »

cathyh

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Re: October 07 Healthletter
« Reply #1 on: November 30, 2007, 05:12:26 PM »
Hi Steve,

This is a good idea. My 11 year old son has very tight hamstrings and calves which cause his ankles to roll inward. He is under the supervision of a podiatrist and wears orthotics and does regular stretching of these muscles. Over two years it has improved but he feels he is at tight as ever. After reading your book I have got him doing the releasing of the hamstrings exercise at the same time as I do, rather than the stretch. 
After reading this article, I'm going to organise to take him to my shiatsu therapist, to get him checked out, as he plays a lot of sport.
I look forward to this treatment program for children- keep up the good work!

cathyh

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Re: October 07 Healthletter- How are your kids bodies going to hold up?
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2008, 08:37:38 PM »
Hi Steve,

What are your thoughts regarding the SLM yoga for a 12 year old? My son Nick had an SLM massage today (as did I, which has helped greatly over the last 6 months), and Wayne thought the SLM yoga might be a bit strenuous for a growing body. Nick has done it a few times with me on weekends, and seems to find it ok.

regards,

Cathy

PS any progress on the solution for children?

Steve Lockhart

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Re: October 07 Healthletter- How are your kids bodies going to hold up?
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2008, 04:20:49 AM »
Hi Cathy, I think the Yoga would be ok but he shouldn't try to push it too hard. For the home massage course I just need to organise a day for the filming which I plan to do very soon,

Good luck,
Regards
Steve

Sagedo

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October 07 Healthletter How are your kids bodies going to hold up
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2009, 01:21:50 PM »
here is a picture of me crashing at colleigate probably spelled wrong nationals last year. it was pretty much the best and worse thing ever. i managed to slip out going in a straight line after the creek gap, and i never let go of my bars.

commit and eat  thats the saying right?

Steve Lockhart

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Re: October 07 Healthletter- How are your kids bodies going to hold up?
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2009, 09:03:49 PM »
No photo came through Sagedo.

 

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