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Author Topic: March Healthletter.- The Road to Recovery  (Read 10577 times)

Steve Lockhart

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March Healthletter.- The Road to Recovery
« on: March 04, 2007, 04:25:52 AM »
This month I wanted to discuss a question that I am constantly being asked. ?How long will it take to get better??

I?m sure you have gathered by now, patience is a very important part of getting rid of back pain properly because like renovating a house, there is a slow methodical process you need to go through to do it properly so it lasts. You don?t repaint a house by just covering over what?s already there, you need to prepare the surfaces painstakingly so that what you apply on top will last and stay looking good for many years to come.

The body is really no different to that house in that your body is at a point where things are breaking down under the pressure and you need to renovate your muscle system to ensure an effective and lasting result.

Probably one of the main reasons most therapists can?t fix chronic pain is because they don?t know how to do that preparation work. They tend to apply the techniques they know straight on top of the problems that are there and it is no wonder those problems soon surface again and the pain comes back.

The big thing about pain in the body is a lack of good circulation to important or structural muscles. These muscles are traumatised or overworked in some way originally to causes them to lock up and vital circulation is restricted. Over time this restriction leads to these muscles becoming weak and not being able to do the job they were designed for. That?s why joints become overloaded and irritated to the point of becoming painful.

Getting those important or structural muscles working again is so much more than some simple stretches or exercises especially when that chronic condition has been around for a few months or more. Also getting them to change back to being efficient functional muscles again day in and day out takes time and this is where the patience comes into play.  It takes time for a muscle to integrate itself back into play with the rest of the body and return to a condition that enables it to maintain that condition for more than a day or two.

The process of a structural muscle working effectively again involves important input from the nervous system as well as an efficient delivery of blood, oxygen, nutrients, and that only happens with a healthy muscle. For a muscle that has been ?out of order? for a long period of time, it can take some months before you can return it to a healthy condition again so it performs as it should.

It is little wonder why these stretching and exercise programs don?t work! They are getting well ahead of themselves and when applied to a dysfunctional muscles they are really useless.

For a muscle to function properly it requires a strong contraction when requested via the nervous system, a good supply of oxygen, nutrients and lymph in and an efficient flow of carbon dioxide, lactic acid and other wastes out. It also needs to work in conjunction with all the other muscles in the body, so they need to be healthy and functional also. If not, the good ones get overloaded and don?t stay good.

For all this to be in place it can take time working on the problem areas and the body can take time adjusting to the changes as they happen. All in all you could be looking at months even a few years before everything is good and the potential to stay pain free exists. And then that is depending you are seeing the right therapist or doing the right program and heading in the right direction as quickly as possible.

For the people doing my self treatment program who ask me the ?how long will it take? question I say you just need to be patient and make sure you are following the program as closely as possible, including all the lifestyle suggestions as they can make a big difference. For those seeing another type of therapist who ask that question I say, make sure you read the Bad Back Book carefully, twice if necessary, and be sure your therapist?s approach is on the right track and they are concentrating on the important areas.

If you have any more specific question on this please post it in this thread.

For your free copy of The Bad Back Book please click here http://www.backpain.com.au/

For information about my Self Treatment Program, click here http://www.backpain.com.au/getrehab
« Last Edit: May 01, 2015, 10:04:04 PM by Steve Lockhart »

Lori

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Re: March Healthletter.
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2007, 09:20:34 PM »
Steve, I have just read your newsletter which was very informative thank you.  I was a little put off when you said it could take years to be pain free.  I have found it difficult to keep on top of the treatment program every morning and night for the past 5 weeks.  It is very time consuming and I don't have time for anything else at present.  In the short term I can manage this but with a part-time job and 2 small children I can't imagine doing it for year(s)!!  If it takes this long to achieve results would this mean following the treatment program fully until then?

Steve Lockhart

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Re: March Healthletter.
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2007, 02:07:44 AM »
Hi Lori, Sorry you misunderstood that sentence. I was saying it can take years to get the body back to a really good condition where it can remain pain free. The pain should leave a lot sooner than that in fact well before you have the body 100%.

Most people's problems have been building up for 20 years or more and yet they may have only had pain for one or two. During that first 18 years their body would have had plenty of problems even though no pain. So once you reverse the deterioration back a couple of years you should be out of pain and that can take one to 3 months.

I suggest with your treatment, if you are trying to cut back on the time, just do the SLM Yoga each day and just an exercise or technique to work on parts of the body that feel restricted in the yoga. If you can't distinguish them yet, share it between working on the erectors, hips/ glutes and hamstrings with the rubber ball. A lot of the other exercises you only need add if an area is particularly tight or weak.

Steve

trenando

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Re: March Healthletter.
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2007, 07:59:11 PM »
Hi Steve,

I too just read your newsletter.  I understand what you're saying about the body taking a long time to readjust itself.  My question is this:
I have a tilted pelvis (short right leg & backward tipped pelvis)... I am following your program every day; however, the slm yoga seems to irritate my non-high hip leg and I find it hard to walk afterwards.  Both legs, esp my non-high hip leg "thunk" in the socket regularly and the referred pain often feels like my non-high hip is trying to poke through the skin at the joint area.  The slm seems to intensify this (esp after the initial stretching after the wall sit/ballet squat), though the other side isn't irritated at all.  Also, these exercises seem to overtighten my already overtight hamstrings...  Do you have any suggestions?  :) 

Thanks for your kind assistance.  Theresa

Steve Lockhart

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Re: March Healthletter.
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2007, 10:41:33 PM »
Hi Theresa, I assume you mean the non high hip when you are standing which would be the short leg. The short leg will be the tight one so if it is getting irritated by the squats and obviously not loosening up I would be doing the ball work on the glute/ hip and the hamstring of that leg. Also when you are doing the wall sit are you doing it for the full 20 minutes as any shorter can mean the muscles get irritated but not properly warmed up.

The hamstrings are most likely overtight because of the tightness in the lower back rather than the hamstrings themselves as if they were particularly blocked you would be able to cramp them during the yoga and release them. Be very focused on keeping your pelvis in the correct balanced position during the wall sitting making the muscles adjust to that and use the ball work to try and get the legs the right length as a priority.

Also eat very well and consider a detox/ cleanse with the fibreblend to help kick things along to help make the muscles as responsive as possible to the work you do.

In future could you please post all specific questions like this in the private members area Theresa. You can send some photos of you standing if you need further diagnosis. These can be posted in the private forum thread also.

Thanks
Steve
« Last Edit: March 05, 2007, 10:46:05 PM by Steve Lockhart »

amesy

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Re: March Healthletter.- The Road to Recovery
« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2011, 01:46:15 AM »
Hi Steve i am wondering if you can tell me what it means if the hip is "thunking" in the joint and what is likely to stop this from happening???

Steve Lockhart

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Re: March Healthletter.- The Road to Recovery
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2011, 06:00:04 PM »
It means your pelvis is out Amsey and you need to balance it again. This link will lead you to a video that will explain it all for you.

www.backpain.com.au/start

Regards
Steve

 

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